Multimedia Gallery

Dendrimers compared with proteins

Dendrimers are synthesised in a series of generations and are similar in size to naturally occurring proteins.

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Typical Dendrimer Molecule

Dendrimers are larger than typical drug molecules such as aspirin, shown here.

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Dendrimer

Dendrimer modified for pharmaceutical activity: red and blue groups are active; yellow groups modify bioavailability and other pharmacokinetic properties; and green groups target specific organs and tissues.

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SPL7013, the active dendrimer in Starpharma's topical microbicide, VivaGel®, binds to surface proteins on HIV, preventing the virus from infecting human T-cells.

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Monovalent Interaction

Typical small molecule drugs interact with single biological targets or receptors.

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Nanoscale Comparisons

Size comparison of various biological structures and a 5 nm dendrimer. A hair is ~50,000 nm in diameter and is shown behind representations of a red blood cell, a bacterium and the HIV virus.

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A dendrimer is capable of polyvalent interactions

A dendrimer is capable of polyvalent interactions with biological targets, such as receptors on a cell membrane.

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VivaGel®

How does VivaGel® work? View an animation about Starpharma's microbicide that is being developed for prevention of HIV infection and genital herpes.

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© Starpharma Holdings Limited 2017